HOW I FEEL AS A NIGERIAN

Explaining to myself in 5 years what happened to Nigeria would come as a flash where in less than fourteen days, things seem to be going back to normal. And normal here ain’t cool. The new normal is how we are getting to where we want to go.

photo credit: @david_nycto

With the destruction and vandalization of properties and buildings that are either privately owned or government-owned, to the killings of brothers and sisters in the country, it is saddening to know that not so much as empathy is the action taken by the government. To make generalizations could easily pan out as false and while I would love to delve into the issue of governance, the harassment of innocent individuals by SARS, let it be known that much importance would not be thrown at the government- the cynical bunch of inhumane humans, the authority leaders, and what they stand for. 

Photo credit: @khannahblack

 The focus is on us, the fight we fight daily, the fists raised for solidarity, the lives changed for the worse, memories that would not fade into thin air and after few taps on the shoulders, it is all forgotten. These moments have redefined an already existing group of Nigerians. Every blink that reminds us of uncertainties and the ones that affirm certainties too. For once, amidst the jokes and memes, scrolling through feeds, stories, and statuses on the various social media platforms, you can hear the same story, you feel the same pain, and when you say “I feel your pain brother, or I feel your pain sister”, you are saying; I indeed feel your pain. And mean every letter of the words- pain, and feel.

Photo credit: @david_nycto

One of the challenges of our time, without being pietistic or moralistic, is to re-instill in the consciousness of our people that sense of human solidarity, of being in the world for one another and because of and through others.”- Mandela (2004)

How we live daily as Nigerians is a dialogue we will have in the open. We would not hide beneath façade of belief and wellness, we would not embrace passive comments as normal and insensitivity as a joke as it affects Nigeria. Almost feels like saying that we are the change we’ve been waiting for. Sounds cliché but yeah, we are! And we will admit that the current system is broken not from an emotional stance but a rational one. This is not merely an argument but an issue I feel and see the evidences.

Photo credit: @khannahblack

Then, you know you are on the right path when it is no longer about you, when your guts do not lie and when the words that keep resounding is go on.

Photo credit:@david_nycto

PS: to know or read up on the latest update of the #ENDSARS movement, click here.

Stay Confident,

Ochez

I find expression writing about life, style, and personal development even as it relates to our day to day activities. This is coupled with the fact that words have a lasting impact on people so I ensure to use them for good.

2 comments On HOW I FEEL AS A NIGERIAN

Leave a reply:

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Site Footer